Mark Yakich and Laura Ellen Scott
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 7:30 P.M., Poetry Room, City Lights Bookstore, San Francisco

reading from new fiction

Mark Yakich

reading from 

A Meaning For Wife

and

Laura Ellen Scott

reading from

Death Wishing

both published by IG Books

about A Meaning For Wife:
Your wife is killed by a cashew (anaphylactic shock), but there isn't time to grieve because your toddler son is always at your heels—wanting to be fed, to be played with, or to sleep next to you all night long. A change of pace seems necessary, so you decide to visit your parents in order to attend your twenty-year high school reunion. What begins as a weekend getaway quickly becomes a theater for dealing with the past—a past that you will have to re-imagine in order to have any hope of a future for you and your son.

Told in second person, A Meaning for Wife is the story of a man trying to come to terms with the sudden death of his wife, the aging parents he has long avoided, and the tribulations of single parenthood.


Mark Yakich is the author of two poetry collections: Unrelated Individuals Forming A Group Waiting to Cross (Penguin, 2004); and, The Importance of Peeling Potatoes in Ukraine (Penguin, 2008). He lives in New Orleans, where he teaches English at Loyola University.       

visit: http://markyakich.com/                                                              

about Death Wishing:                                                                                                     What if your most fervent wish could come true, and all you had to do was…die first. Recovering from a bitter divorce, middle-aged Victor Swaim wants nothing more than to live a carefree, drunken existence in New Orleans, making capes and corsets, and lusting for Pebbles, the girl who lives across the street.

But, after a series of deathbed wishes come true—including the curing of cancer, the elimination of cats, the return of Elvis (1967 vintage), the clouds turning orange, mothers growing third eyes and cups of coffee becoming bottomless—the hysteria that grows around "Death Wishing" forces Victor into action. Along with his entrepreneurial son Val and his libertine friend Martine, Victor must battle the apocalyptics who have seduced Pebbles away from her true vocation of singing the blues (very badly) while at the same time confronting his mortal identity: just what would he wish for the world without him in it?

Laura Ellen Scott teaches fiction writing at George Mason University. Her work has been selected for The Wigleaf Top Fifty of 2009 and Barrelhouse magazine's "Futures" issue. She has twice been nominated for Dzanc's Best of the Web 2010 anthology.

visit: http://lauraellenscott.com/