Our Authors






Rebecca Solnit


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The Encyclopedia of Trouble and Spaciousness
Rebecca Solnit
The incomparable Rebecca Solnit, author of more than a dozen acclaimed, prizewinning books of nonfiction including Men Explain Things To Me, brings the same dazzling writing to the essays in The Encyclopedia of Trouble and Spaciousness.



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The Faraway Nearby
Rebecca Solnit
In this exquisitely written new book by the author of A Paradise Built in Hell, Rebecca Solnit explores the ways we make our lives out of stories, and how we are connected by empathy, by narrative, by imagination. In the course of unpacking some of her own stories—of her mother and her decline from memory loss, of a trip to Iceland...



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A Field Guide to Getting Lost
Rebecca Solnit
A Field Guide to Getting Lost is about the stories we use to navigate our way through the world and the places we traverse, from wilderness to cities, in finding ourselves or losing ourselves. Written as a series of autobiographical essays, it draws on...



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Wanderlust
A History of Walking
Rebecca Solnit
Drawing together many histories-of anatomical evolution and city design, of treadmills and labyrinths, of walking clubs and sexual mores-Rebecca Solnit creates a fascinating portrait of the range of possibilities presented by walking.






Edited by Rebecca Solnit

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Nonstop Metropolis
A New York City Atlas
Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Rebecca Solnit
Nonstop Metropolis, the culminating volume in a trilogy of atlases, conveys innumerable unbound experiences of New York City through twenty-six imaginative maps and informative essays. Bringing together the insights of dozens of experts—from linguists to music historians, ethnographers, urbanists, and environmental journalists...



With Rebecca Solnit

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Streetopia
Erick Lyle
Utopic San Francisco exists in the unrelenting imaginations of some of our most brilliant local artists and activists. This series of essays and photographs challenges us to reimagine urban space as an artistic playground for all—not just for techies and the nouveau riches. —Recommended by Ivy, City Lights Books