New Hardcover Nonfiction
Books in this online selection represent only a sliver of what we offer in the store. If you've got a particular book in mind and want to check on its availability, call us at 415-362-8193.

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In the House of the Interpreter
A Memoir
Ngugi Wa'Thiong'O
Ngugi wa Thiong'o is a writer who has lived through extraordinary times. In the House of the Interpreter tells the story of his schooldays in Kenya against the backdrop of the intensification of the struggle for independence.
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Capital in the 21st Century
Thomas Piketty
What are the grand dynamics that drive the accumulation and distribution of capital? Questions about the long-term evolution of inequality, the concentration of wealth, and the prospects for economic growth lie at the heart of political economy. But satisfactory answers have been hard to find for lack of adequate data and clear guiding theories...
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The Age of Dignity
Preparing for the Elder Boom in a Changing America
Ai-Jen Poo
By 2035, 11.5 million Americans will be over the age of eighty-five, more than double today's 5 million, living longer than ever before. To enable all of us to age with dignity and security in the face of this coming Age Wave, our society must learn to value the care of our elders.
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The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic
Sam Quinones
Two horrifying tales of unintended consequences, brilliantly interwoven by a master of narrative nonfiction. Powerful and important. —Recommended by Jeff, City Lights Books
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American Pulp
How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street
Paula Rabinowitz
American Pulp tells the story of the midcentury golden age of pulp paperbacks and how they brought modernism to Main Street, democratized literature and ideas, spurred social mobility, and helped readers fashion new identities. Drawing on extensive original research, Paula Rabinowitz unearths the far-reaching political, social, and aesthetic...
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Destruction Was My Beatrice
Dada and the Unmaking of the Twentieth Century
Jed Rasula
The perfect companion to Hugo Ball's Flight Out of Time, Huelsenbeck's Memoirs of a Dada Drummer, and Hans Richter's Art and Anti-Art. Jed Rasula has done a great service to Dada lovers everywhere. This is sure to be the "go to" book for years to come. —Recommended by Peter, City Lights Books
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Mission High
One School, How Experts Tried to Fail It, and the Students and Teachers Who Made It Triumph
Kristina Rizga
Darrell is a reflective, brilliant young man, who never thought of himself as a good student. He always struggled with his reading and writing skills. Darrell's father, a single parent, couldn't afford private tutors. By the end of middle school, Darrell’s grades and his confidence were at an all time low. Then everything changed.
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So You've Been Publicly Shamed
Jon Ronson
An introspective, often uncomfortable, and always compelling examination of public shaming in the era of social media. Despite the fact that this form of punishment was outlawed more than a century ago, Twitter "vigilantes" have inspired its resurgence. Jon talks with folks whose lives have been touched (and sometimes ruined) by this intense new...
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Nabokov in America
On the Road to Lolita
Robert Roper
How did Lolita come to be? The author dissects Nabokov's exile in America and the masterpiece resulting from it, without lionizing either the man or his ouevre. Engaging. —Recommended by Jeff, City Lights Books
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They Know Everything About You
How Data-Collecting Corporations and Snooping Government Agencies Are Destroying Democracy
Robert Scheer
They Know Everything About You is a groundbreaking exposé of how government agencies and tech corporations monitor virtually every aspect of our lives, and a fierce defense of privacy and democracy. The revelation that the government has access to a vast trove of personal online data demonstrates that we already live in a surveillance society.
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The Witches
Salem, 1692
Stacy Schiff
The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Cleopatra, the #1 national bestseller, unpacks the mystery of the Salem Witch Trials. It began in 1692, over an exceptionally raw Massachusetts winter, when a minister's daughter began to scream and convulse. It ended less than a year later, but not before 19 men and women had been hanged...
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Madness in Civilization
A Cultural History of Insanity from the Bible to Freud from the Madhouse to Modern Medicine
Andrew Scull
The loss of reason, a sense of alienation from the commonsense world we all like to imagine we inhabit, the shattering emotional turmoil that seizes hold and won't let go—these are some of the traits we associate with madness. Today, mental disturbance is most commonly viewed through a medical lens, but societies have also sought to make...
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The Year of Lear
Shakespeare in 1606
James Shapiro
A brilliant rumination on how subversive and terrorist actions of late 1605 through 1606, as well as the citizenry's feelings about Elizabeth's replacement on the throne and the capital's experience with the plague, possibly informed and reconfigured the writing, performing, and publishing of the three plays attributed to Shakespeare...
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Dear White People
A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in "Post-Racial" America
Justin Simien
In the satirical tradition of the New York Times bestseller Stuff White People Like comes this witty companion book to the "incredibly entertaining" (Indiewire) film of the same name, which “heralds a fresh and funny new voice” (Variety). Right out of college, Justin Simien wrote a screenplay about the nuanced experiences of four black students.

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