George Lakey
Sunday, November 19, 2017, 5:00 p.m., City Lights Booksellers & Publishers, 261 Columbus Ave. San Francisco, CA 94133

 

presenting a talk titled

A NATION DIVIDED: What can we learn from the Nordics?

In the 1930s Sweden and Norway were even more polarized than the U.S. is now. The far right and the far left battled for control of the countries' economic and political direction. By the 1950s they'd reached consensus and were in the top tier of international ratings for equality, freedom and shared abundance. Author George Lakey tells secrets of their success, from his book Viking Economics published by Melville House.. Sweden and Norway share with Iceland and Denmark the Nordic economic model, even though only Norway struck oil. Their sixty-year track record brings them top billings: "best place in the world to be a senior," "best place to be a mom," best educational system, "more start-ups per capita than the U.S." They are not utopia and they do make mistakes, as revealed in a book Bill McKibben calls "completely fascinating" and Frances Moore Lappé calls "fun to read and just what Americans need right now."  Lakey believes these small countries made themselves into laboratories that others can learn from.

George Russell Lakey is an activist, sociologist, and writer who added academic underpinning to the concept of nonviolent revolution. He also refined the practice of experiential training for activists which he calls "Direct Education". A Quaker, he has co-founded and led numerous organizations and campaigns for justice and peace.and former Swarthmore professor.


Books related to this event:

Product image
Viking Economics
How the Scandinavians Got It Right-and How We Can, Too
George Lakey
2016 Edition
Liberals worldwide invoke Scandinavia as a promised land of equality, while most conservatives fear it as a hotbed of liberty-threatening socialism. But the left and right can usually agree on one thing: that the Nordic system is impossible to replicate elsewhere. The US and UK are too big, or too individualistic, or too . . . something.