LOGIC Magazine Release Party
Thursday, October 12, 2017, 7:00 p.m., City Lights Booksellers, 261 Columbus Avenue, San Francisco

Litquake and City Lights present on the occasion of LITQUAKE 2017

A LOGIC MAGAZINE Release Party

with Logic's founding editors: Ben Tarnoff, Moira Weigel, Jim Fingal, Christa Hartsock and Logic contributors to be announced.

LOGIC is a new magazine devoted to technology and society. Hear thier editors read from their founding manifesto, and listen to contributors explore the subject of the latest issue: SEX. Past issues have explored coding's gender crisis, the failure of collective intelligence in the age of Trump, and the industrialization of medicine through software.

Learn more about the magazine, and read their manifesto, at logicmag.io.

Ben Tarnoff writes about technology and politics for The Guardian and Jacobin. His most recent book is The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature.

Moira Weigel writes about gender and technology for The New York Times, The Guardian, and The New Republic. She is the author of Labor Love: The Invention of Dating.

Jim Fingal is a software developer and the Head of Product Engineering at Amino. He is the co-author, with John D'Agata, of The Lifespan of a Fact.

Christa Hartsock is a software developer and a 2017 Code for America Fellow.

About LITQUAKE:

Originally hatched over beers at the Edinburgh Castle pub in 1999, Litstock debuted as a free one-day reading series in a fog-bound Golden Gate Park. Local writers Jane Ganahl and Jack Boulware realized quickly that booklovers craved something grander. Against the backdrop of a technology-crazed San Francisco, writers were still drawn to the city, and readers still appreciated the written word. In 2002, the festival was rechristened Litquake, and began expanding its programming to include all elements of the Bay Area literary scene. Whether it's poets reciting in a cathedral, authors discussing science versus religion in a library, or novelists reading in a beekeeping supply store, the goal remains the same: whet a broad range of literary appetites, present the literary fare in a variety of traditional and unlikely venues, and make it vivid, real, and entertaining. Now grown to the largest independent literary festival on the West Coast, Litquake continues its mission as a nine-day literary spectacle for booklovers, complete with cutting-edge panel discussions, unique cross-media events, and hundreds of readings.