Haiti Glass

Haiti Glass





"'quaking conversation' is Poetry Foundation’s Poem of the Day"
Jan 25, 2017
- Poetry Foundation

"Recommended Reading for Pride Month, 2016"
Jun 24, 2016

Haiti Glass is one of the 10 book the National Book Foundation recommends for Pride Month 2016.

- National Book Foundation

"Former City Poet Laureate Lenelle Moïse Wins Award for First Book"
Dec 30, 2015

Details on Lenelle Moïse's winning of the 2015 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award for her book Haiti Glass, featuring an interview with Moïse talking about the award and the book.

"'To me, Haiti Glass is about zooming in and going slow,' Moïse said, and by doing so, she feels, honoring each precious life and memory within the devastation. The book proved to be her method of 'writing through a lot of feelings of loss.'"

 

- Daily Hampshire Gazette

"A Female Poetry Explosion in the Caribbean"
Sep 12, 2015
Lenelle Moïse profiled as a female Caribbean poet to watch for.
 
"Born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and raised near Boston, 35-year-old Moïse is a Renaissance woman. A playwright, spoken-word artist, essayist, screenwriter and actress, she channels the Haitian immigrant experience in her varied works. A former Northampton, Massachusetts, Poet Laureate, her 2014 poetry collection, Haiti Glass, offers an unblinking dive into both privilege and catastrophe, in words best read aloud in a strong voice. Haiti Glass has been recognized as a Lambda Literary Award Finalist for Lesbian Poetry, and the praise keeps rolling in. Last fall, Moïse told the City Lights Books blog that if her book had a sound track, it would be 'of shard crunch, hoarse voices scatting, bursts of laughter like thunder, and the softest hums.'"––Shannon Sims 
- OZY

"Bookmarks: National Poetry Month"
Apr 30, 2015

 

For National Poetry Month 2015, Keith Orr (owner of Ann Arbor's Language Bookstore) offers insight into the importance of poetry while recommending great works to both those old and new to the genre. Included in this list (besides Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and Other Poems) is Lenelle Moïse’s Haiti Glass from City Lights/Sister Spit.
 
"Sixty Years after the publication of "Howl," City Lights began a collaboration with poet and author Michelle Tea to publish two to three books a year under the imprint of Sister Spit. Tea is the author of Valencia, founder of the Radar Reading series, co-founder of the legendary Sister Spit literary tours and cultural promoter. The imprint is grabbing the attention of the LGBT literary world.
 
"The imprint's first collection of poetry already has received a Lambda Literary nomination. Lenelle Moise is a playwright and performance artist, and it comes through in her debut collection of poetry. Alternating rhythms of hip hop and Haiti drive these poems of identity. The vodou of Haiti is a constant point of reference in her grappling of a Haitian-American identity. Even in her ode to Michael Jackson, 'a pump of bony pelvis' she calls him a ghede (spirit) and zombie."

 

- Pride Source

"Live Art Magazine Issue II"
Oct 22, 2014

Lenelle Moïse talks to Monte Belmonte and reads from her book Haiti Glass for Live Art Magazine II on WRSI in Northampton, where she was the Poet Laureate from 2010-2012.

- Monte Belmonte, WRSI - Northampton

Velvetpark

"Hard to believe then that this is [Moïse's] first book, which captures her passionate live performance in a way one can linger a little longer and study a little more closely her precisely chosen words. Moïse's poems range from memories of childhood growing up in Haiti and American, to stories from her homeland marked by the atrocities of abject poverty and environmental disaster. Moïse's work is always self-reflective, political and personal navigating the hurdles faced by black and brown immigrants in a promised land full of gated privilege. Her verse investigates the underbelly of family and society looking starkly at sexuality, violence and hope as it confronts despair."––Grace Moon, Velvetpark


Lambda Literary Review

"The year 2014 will be hard pressed to give us a more powerful debut poetry collection than Lenelle Moïse's Haiti Glass . . . This is the rare book of poetry that makes one pause while reading, look up from the page, whistle low."--Courtney Gillette, Lambda Literary Review