Inside/Out

Inside/Out
Selected Poems
Preface by David Meltzer




Press Reviews

The Rumpus

"...though it is unclear from Buck's writing what place organized religion had for her after she left home, these pages contain prayers, answers, wise and generous gifts."

—Barbara Berman


The Brooklyn Rall

"With the grace of Lucille Clifton and the force of June Jordan, Buck establishes undeniable presence. Courageous and compelling — make room for some new 'survival code'."

—The Brooklyn Rail


Make/shift

"Another shimmery link on the chain of poetic resistance... [Buck's] poems are about light, being cut off from nature in prison..., loneliness, the refusal of desire, physical touch that isn't possible, and the joy and escape she is able to find in a place so khaki and drab."

—Jade Brooks


Women's Review of Books

"...There are some writers—Karen Blixen, Flannery O'Connor, Zora Neale Hurston—whose lives are so unusual that an appreciation of their work deepens with an acquaintance with the life. Buck's work can best be appreciated in terms of her commitment to anti-imperialist activism and her internment in federal prisons for nearly three decades. She somehow managed to find, in that harsh confinement so unfamiliar to most of us, meaning and friendship, and she imparted to the world through her work, moments of insight, consolation, and joy..."

—Martha Gies, Women's Review of Books


The Rag Blog

"There are no apologies here, no appeals for special consideration. As she rejected white-skin privilege in life, binding herself to oppressed people in words and deeds, Marilyn Buck sought no deathbed, deus ex machina salvation from prison, cancer, or the condemnation of the self-righteous... Inside/Out is a special gift, long dreamed-of."

—Mariann G. Wizard


Ms. Magazine

"This is an important book on so many levels. First, of course, because it contains a number of excellent poems, more than most poetry collections published today. Second, because it models a degree of resistance most of us are never called upon to develop. And third, because it reminds us of the many, many lives limited or cut short by a pompous, uncaring system that is more interested in bullying than redemption."