The Green New Deal and Beyond
The Green New Deal and Beyond
Ending the Climate Emergency While We Still Can
Foreword by Noam Chomsky





Excerpt on The Progressive
Jun 1, 2020

Recommended by The Revelator
May 20, 2020

The operative word in the title is "beyond." Cox, lead scientist at The Land Institute, walks us through what the current iteration of the Green New Deal misses and what it would take to get to a zero-emissions future. Noam Chomsky provides the foreword.


Interview with Kris Welch on KPFA
May 20, 2020

In a new book on the subject, author-scientist Stan Cox argues the Green New Deal relies too much on business as usual, the growth model of capitalism.  He argues for a radical restructuring of our society—and he's optimistic about the possibility! Hosted by Kris Welch.


Review in the New York Journal of Books (reprinted on 8 additional sites)
May 19, 2020

"Stan Cox is one of those deep thinkers who are highly cautious about unbridled support for a concept that might have drawbacks. In his foreword to the book Noam Chomsky notes that pro-GND US congresspersons do not directly challenge the fossil fuel industry."—Don Fitz, New York Journal of Books

This review also appeared on Green Social Thought, Attack the System, CounterCurrents, CounterPunch, Dissident Voice, Znet, Occasion2B, and on Resilience!


Amy Goodman in discussion with Noam Chomsky and Stan Cox about the prospects for the Green New Deal
May 19, 2020

Co-presented by City Lights & Democracy Now!

Amy Goodman in discussion with Noam Chomsky and Stan Cox about the prospects for the Green New Deal, how the pandemic does–and does not—affect the struggle for climatic and economic justice, among other relevant topics. This event was originally broadcast live via Crowdcast on Tuesday, May 19th. This video starts about 8 minutes into the live broadcast due to audio difficulties.

WE THANK OUR CO-SPONSORS: Alternative Radio, The Climate Mobilization,CODEPINK, Counterpunch, Extinction Rebellion,The Gund Institute, Haymarket Books, The Institute for Social Ecology, Post-Carbon Institute, Post Growth Institute, Project Censored, Research and Degrowth, and Truthout .


Interview in "Peace News"
May 5, 2020

"Going Slowly to 100% Renewables . . .by 2025?"

“We have to begin adapting our economy now to living on a smaller energy supply. That will mean maintaining production of essential goods and services while eliminating all wasteful and superfluous production." For example, this would mean giving up on visions of widespread electric car ownership, a “non-solution” according to Cox because the vehicles require massive amounts of mining for materials, as non-electric cars do. Cox urges refurbishing existing rail rather than using massive amounts of concrete to build new rail.

 


Excerpt on Resilience
May 4, 2020

Review in "Real Change News"
Apr 29, 2020

"In The Green New Deal, author Stan Cox argues persuasively that, while the program definitely is worth supporting, by itself it won't bring carbon dioxide in the atmosphere back to sustainable levels. This is because the program is still premised on growing the economy, which means an increase in energy use that cannot be met solely with renewable energy, at least in the short term."—Mike Wold, Real Change News


"Resilience" publishes review from "Uneven Earth"
Apr 28, 2020

Review on "Climate & Capitalism"
Apr 25, 2020

"The Green New Deal will be a step in the right direction, but it isn't enough. Author and plant scientist Stan Cox explains why we must abolish the use of fossil fuels as soon as possible, and how it can be done. He addresses a host of glaring issues not mentioned in the GND and offers ideas for a solution to the deepening crisis."


Houston Chronicle oped reprinted at Resilience.org
Apr 24, 2020

Houston Chronicle oped reprinted at Counterpunch.org
Apr 24, 2020

Book's foreword, authored by Noam Chomsky, is published on Lit Hub
Apr 22, 2020

"Moving to zero net carbon emissions, and fast, is the point of Stan Cox's important new study, The Green New Deal and Beyond. Cox advocates on behalf of the GND as one step of several we need to take to stabilize the planet. But as Cox and others point out, the GND does not challenge the fossil-fuel industry. In fact, the term "fossil fuels" appears nowhere in the Congressional GND resolutions, and the GND think tanks are not stressing the elimination of fossil fuels. Cox suggests policies that would free us from fossil fuel use before it’s too late. He also suggests doing so in a manner that breaks the patterns of social, racial, and environmental injustice that have been historically inseparable from the forms of economic injustice that have destabilized the planet’s ecosystem."


Essay in "Yes Magazine"
Apr 22, 2020

"My new book went to press just as the coronavirus pandemic was starting. If I were still working on The Green New Deal and Beyond: Ending the Climate Emergency While We Still Can, I'd add a preface discussing the pandemic's relevance to the climate emergency. We Americans have learned that we do have the capacity to take unprecedented, radical actions that deal with a fast-breaking existential threat like the coronavirus. I’d write that we must be willing to take just-as-drastic actions against our less visible degradation of the global climate. . . . "—Stan Cox


Op-ed in the Houston Chronicle
Apr 17, 2020

Co-authored with Ezra Silk

Government needs plans for rationing food and basic essentials during pandemics, other crises.

For weeks, pandemic-induced overbuying has resulted in shortages of staple foods and sanitation products. With their shelves stripped, supermarkets are donating much less to food banks just as those services are being overwhelmed by a surge of newly jobless clients. Disinfectant wipes are selling for extortionate prices online — if they are available at all.

Now, with a COVID-19 outbreak having shut down a South Dakota meatpacking plant, sickening hundreds of workers and choking off nearly 5 percent of U.S. pork production in one fell swoop, concern is growing that the coronavirus could spread throughout the food-production and processing industries. Food retailers, already reeling from excess consumer demand and struggling to stop the spread of infection in their own workforce, could be hit with even more acute scarcity as their supply chains fall apart.


Review in "Uneven Earth"
Apr 7, 2020

"In writing this book, Stan Cox could not have anticipated that the spread of COVID-19 may itself present an emergency situation requiring the restructuring and planning of the economy. The recently passed CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act in the U.S., which includes loan forgiveness and emergency funds for economic relief, has attempted to intervene in this emergency for the sake of stabilizing the economy. Cox would likely respond that such drastic intervention must become the new normal, but not for the sake of the market. Rather, he would argue that such an emergency should be an impetus for simplifying, standardizing, and restructuring production and consumption. Cox argues that this is not idealism, but necessity. By 2030 or 2040, if our aims and policies turn out to have been insufficient, as he points out, it will have been too late."—Natalie Suzelis, Uneven Earth


Review in "Kirkus Reviews"
Apr 7, 2020

"A strictly science-based plan for effectively addressing the dire realities of climate change. Geneticist and science writer Cox begins with bad news, although good news is rarely in evidence. Earth's average temperature is now 2.2 degrees higher than in the pre–fossil fuel era. This may sound trivial, but it is anything but. A rise of another half degree will produce widespread human suffering, but we are on course for a catastrophic nearly 6 degree rise by 2100. Activists advocate the Green New Deal plan that cuts carbon emissions to zero through transition to an economy running on non-fossil energy. After expressing admiration, Cox adds that it won't work. As he writes, the assumption that "renewable energy coming on line each year will be matched by an equivalent amount of coal-, oil-, or gas-fired capacity going off line" is wrong. So far, it's mostly added to the total energy pool. It's imperative that we stop using fossil fuels and ditch our obsessions with economic growth, new technology, and quick-fix (and ineffective), market-oriented approaches such as carbon taxes. Cox proposes to ban all mining and extraction, possibly after nationalizing the fossil fuel industries. More realistic than the average activist, he points out that clean sources can’t replace these in the foreseeable future, so the world will have to get along with less energy. Since the poor benefit under the Green New Deal, the burden will fall on the wealthy and upper middle classes, whose standard of living may drop to that of Denmark or Switzerland, nations that use half the energy of the U.S. Cox’s audience, deeply worried about global warming, may protest that his prescriptions seem unrealistic as well as political poison. Anticipating this, he delivers a blunt rebuttal: "Weaning ourselves off high levels of energy use now is good practice for a future in which a weaning is going to happen, like it or not." Convincing, painful, and a long shot—but better than the alternative."


Feature on the LA Progressive
Apr 6, 2020

Essay on Counter Punch "Climbing the Deadly Curves of COVID-19 and Capitalism"
Mar 26, 2020

"A functional government in Washington, if we had one, could learn from this terrible episode that its primary goal can and must be to achieve economic sufficiency for all and excess for none while at the same time driving fossil-fuel extraction and use down to zero, by law and on a deadline. All of that will require redirecting the nation's resources away from wasteful and superfluous production toward ensuring economic security and good quality of life for the nation’s non-affluent majority."


Essay: "Peer Pressure? Too Little and Way Too Late for the Climate Emergency"
Mar 11, 2020