I Couldn't Even Imagine That They Would Kill Us

I Couldn't Even Imagine That They Would Kill Us
An Oral History of the Attacks Against the Students of Ayotzinapa
Foreword by Ariel Dorfman





"Chosen one of the Best Books of 2017 by Publishers Weekly"
Oct 27, 2017

"Journalist Gibler's investigative prowess yields a book that uses a chorus of voices—eyewitness accounts of the students and others at the scene—to add depth and clarity to the Sept. 26, 2014, massacre of students in the city of Iguala, Mexico, that left six people dead, 40 wounded, and 43 students missing who have yet to be seen since. It's an unforgettable reconstruction of a national tragedy."—Publishers Weekly, Best of 2017, Nonfiction


"Interview with John Gibler in Publishers Weekly"
Oct 27, 2017

In I Couldn't Even Imagine That They Would Kill Us: An Oral History of the Attacks Against the Students of Ayotzinapa, journalist Gibler reconstructs the events of Sept. 26, 2014, in Iguala, Mexico, that left six people dead and 43 students missing.


Publishers Weekly

"Journalist Gibler delivers a meticulous and affecting recreation of the events of Sept. 26, 2014, in Iguala, Mexico, when police attacked five buses carrying students from the Ayotzinapa Teachers' College and a youth soccer team. . . . It's a heartbreaking reconstruction of a horrific event, made all the more profound by the persistent demand from the parents of the disappeared, their classmates, and citizens across country for the safe return of the students."—Publishers Weekly, Starred Review


Library Journal

"Gibler determined the story was best told through 'writing by listening,' and here he weaves a narrative of the harrowing events through the words of the students, offering multiple points of view. The families of the missing then offer their accounts as they seek answers from the government, which was complicit not only in the attacks but in covering up the truth of what happened. The result is a raw and vulnerable glimpse into the violence that continues to affect parts of Mexico and the pain of parents who still don't know what happened to their children."—Library Journal


A Contra corriente

"The actual text of the oral history of infamy is an intensely subtle composition. The writer draws on a wide repertoire of personal sensitivities, contextual knowledge, intellectual lucidity, analytical gradations, and wordsmithing, to turn the denunciation of the events of one night, into a shared space of resistance against the rule of contemporary totalitarianism. . . . The book is one of those rare publications that brings together written and spoken words in concert with one another—a literary accomplishment seldom found in print . . ."—Cornelia Grabner, A Contra corriente    


Booklist

 "This is an essential work of exacting, caring, and memorializing reportage."—Booklist, Starred Review


Kirkus Reviews

"An oral history of one horrific night when busloads of unarmed students were attacked by local Mexican police. . . . cumulatively very moving."—Kirkus Reviews


"John Gibler discusses Aytozinapa case with Upside Down World and NACLA"
Sep 26, 2017

John Gibler discusses Aytozinapa case with Upside Down World and NACLA.


"'I Couldn't Even Imagine That They Would Kill Us' used as a primary source for interactive platform"

John Gibler's book is a key primary source for an investigation into the attacks against the students by London-based Forensic Architecture.


"The Intercept credits John Gibler for Forensic Architecture's interactive platform"
Sep 7, 2017

The Intercept discusses Forensic Archticture's interactive platform and credits John Gibler's book, I Couldn't Even Imagine That They Would Kill Us.


"Wired credits John Gibler for Forensic Architecture's interactive platform"
Sep 7, 2017

Wired discusses Forensic Architecture's interactive platform and credits John Gibler's book, I Couldn't Even Imagine That They Would Kill Us.


Op-ed by Francisco Goldman in "The New York Times"
Jun 29, 2017

"As the journalist John Gibler recently remarked, in Mexico 'It's infinitely more dangerous to report on an assassination than it is to commit it.' The latest proof is the killing of Javier Valdez, one of Mexico's most admired journalists."—Francisco Goldman