Every Day We Get More Illegal
Every Day We Get More Illegal


A State of the Union from the nation's first Latino Poet Laureate. Trenchant, compassionate, and filled with hope.

"Many poets since the 1960s have dreamed of a new hybrid art, part oral, part written, part English, part something else: an art grounded in ethnic identity, fueled by collective pride, yet irreducibly individual too. Many poets have tried to create such an art: Herrera is one of the first to succeed."— New York Times

“Herrera has the unusual capacity to write convincing political poems that are as personally felt as poems can be.”—NPR

In this collection of poems, written during and immediately after two years on the road as United States Poet Laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera reports back on his travels through contemporary America. Poems written in the heat of witness, and later, in quiet moments of reflection, coalesce into an urgent, trenchant, and yet hope-filled portrait. The struggle and pain of those pushed to the edges, the shootings and assaults and injustices of our streets, the lethal border game that separates and divides, and then: a shift of register, a leap for peace and a view onto the possibility of unity. Every Day We Get More Illegal is a jolt to the conscience—filled with the multiple powers of the many voices and many textures of every day in America.

Title Every Day We Get More Illegal
Publisher City Lights Publishers
BISAC Subject Heading POE000000 POETRY
POL000000 POLITICAL SCIENCE
SOC000000 SOCIAL SCIENCE
Title First Published 14 July 2020
Format Paperback
Nb of pages 180 p.
ISBN-10 0872868281
ISBN-13 9780872868281
Publication Date 14 July 2020
Main content page count 180
Weight 16 oz.
List Price $17.95
 


We also suggest

Product image
Lotería Cards and Fortune Poems
A Book of Lives
Juan Felipe Herrera, Artemio Rodríguez
1999 Edition
 


other titles relative to
Poetry
Politics

tags
activist poetry, anti-fascism, bilingual poetry, Chicano poetry, Chicano studies, latinx identity, latinx poetry, poetry without borders, political poetry, social movements, U.S. Mexico border, undocument immigrants, United States poet laureate